SurviveJS - Maintenance
SurviveJS - Maintenance
$14.99
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$14.99
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SurviveJS - Maintenance

This book is 85% complete

Last updated on 2018-03-19

About the Book

SurviveJS - Maintenance is meant for anyone who has to develop and maintain JavaScript applications or packages.

The purpose of this book is to gather development practices that are particularly useful for anyone who has to maintain JavaScript code or code that compiles to JavaScript.

I, Juho Vepsäläinen, and my co-author Artem Sapegin, have spent years developing npm packages and JavaScript projects. As a result we have gained insight on how to do it and how not to do it. The book combines our experience into a concise format that allows you to improve your development experience.

What Will You Learn

Unless you work on fresh greenfield projects all the time, maintenance concerns are something that will come up fast. The book has been structured into small parts where you learn:

  • How to manage npm packages
  • How to improve code quality
  • How to set up infrastructure for your project
  • How to document the project in a sustainable manner
  • How to plan for the future

In addition, there are small appendices that delve into deeper detail on topics such as monorepos and customizing ESLint.

Table of Contents

  •  
    • Preface
    • Introduction
      • What Will You Learn
      • How Is the Book Organized
      • Who Is the Book For
      • Book Versioning
      • Getting Support
      • Additional Material
      • Acknowledgments
  • I Packaging
    • 1. Where to Start Packaging
      • 1.1 To Consume Packages or to Develop Them
      • 1.2 Use an Existing Package
      • 1.3 Enhance an Existing Package
      • 1.4 Take Over an Existing Package
      • 1.5 Fork an Existing Package
      • 1.6 Develop Your Own Package
      • 1.7 Consumption Workflow
      • 1.8 Using Private Packages
      • 1.9 Understanding npm Lookup
      • 1.10 Conclusion
    • 2. Anatomy of a Package
      • 2.1 Understanding package.json
      • 2.2 What Files to Publish
      • 2.3 Conclusion
    • 3. Publishing Packages
      • 3.1 Understanding SemVer
      • 3.2 Increasing a Version
      • 3.3 Publishing a Pre-Release Version
      • 3.4 Deprecating, Unpublishing, and Renaming Packages
      • 3.5 Sharing Authorship
      • 3.6 Conclusion
    • 4. Building Packages
      • 4.1 Communicating Where Code Should Work
      • 4.2 Compiling to Support Specific Environments
      • 4.3 Generating a Build on postinstall
      • 4.4 Configuring Babel for Tree Shaking
      • 4.5 Using Other Languages Than JavaScript
      • 4.6 Cross-Platform Concerns
      • 4.7 Conclusion
    • 5. Standalone Builds
      • 5.1 How Bundlers Work
      • 5.2 Universal Module Definition (UMD)
      • 5.3 Generating a Build Using Rollup
      • 5.4 Conclusion
    • 6. Managing Dependencies
      • 6.1 Types of Dependencies
      • 6.2 Keeping Dependencies Updated
      • 6.3 Understanding Version Ranges
      • 6.4 Locking Versions
      • 6.5 Conclusion
  • II Code Quality
    • 7. Linting
      • 7.1 Why to Lint
      • 7.2 Linting JavaScript With ESLint
      • 7.3 Linting TypeScript With TSLint
      • 7.4 Linting CSS With Stylelint
      • 7.5 Conclusion
    • 8. Code Formatting
      • 8.1 Achieving Code Consistency
      • 8.2 Configuring IDEs and Editors With EditorConfig
      • 8.3 Formatting Code With Prettier
      • 8.4 Formatting CSS With Stylelint
      • 8.5 Conclusion
    • 9. Typing
      • 9.1 The Value of Typing
      • 9.2 Flow
      • 9.3 TypeScript
      • 9.4 The Benefits of Flow and TypeScriipt
      • 9.5 Type Definitions
      • 9.6 Challenges of Typing
      • 9.7 Conclusion
    • 10. Testing
      • 10.1 What to Verify With Testing
      • 10.2 Develop the Right System the Right Way
      • 10.3 How Much to Test
      • 10.4 How to Test Old Projects Without Tests
      • 10.5 Types of Testing
      • 10.6 Conclusion
  • III Infrastructure
    • 11. Processes
      • 11.1 How to Track Issues
      • 11.2 How to Manage Pull Requests
      • 11.3 How to Design a Development Process
      • 11.4 How to Support Users
      • 11.5 Conclusion
    • 12. Continuous Integration
      • 12.1 Setting up Travis CI
      • 12.2 Conclusion
    • 13. Automation
      • 13.1 Git Commit Messages
      • 13.2 Semantic Release
      • 13.3 Git Hooks
      • 13.4 Automating Linting With lint-staged
      • 13.5 Automating Releases
      • 13.6 gh-lint
      • 13.7 Danger
      • 13.8 Configuration Automation
      • 13.9 Bots
      • 13.10 Conclusion
  • IV Documentation
    • 14. README
      • 14.1 What a README Should Contain
      • 14.2 Automating README
      • 14.3 Testing Examples
      • 14.4 Conclusion
    • 15. Change Logs
      • 15.1 Why Not Commit Log
      • 15.2 What Is a Good Change Log
      • 15.3 Conclusion
    • 16. Site
      • 16.1 How to Set up a Site
      • 16.2 Interactive Examples and Demos
      • 16.3 Hosting
      • 16.4 Deployment
      • 16.5 Domain Names
      • 16.6 Search
      • 16.7 Comments
      • 16.8 Testing
      • 16.9 Conclusion
    • 17. API Documentation
      • 17.1 Documenting APIs in Code
      • 17.2 Generating Documentation
    • 18. Other Types of Documentation
      • 18.1 Contribution Guidelines
      • 18.2 Code of Conduct
      • 18.3 Issue and Pull Request Templates
    • 19. Linting and Formatting
      • 19.1 Linting Markdown With Textlint and Proselint
      • 19.2 Formatting Markdown With Prettier
      • 19.3 Conclusion
  • V Future
    • 20. Longevity
      • 20.1 Who Is Going to Develop the Project
      • 20.2 Who Is Going to Pay for the Development
      • 20.3 Who Is Going to Make Sure the Project Stays on Track
      • 20.4 What Happens If Developers Disappear From the Project
      • 20.5 How to Attract People to the Project
      • 20.6 How to Keep Track of Everything
      • 20.7 How to Maintain a Popular Project
      • 20.8 Conclusion
    • 21. Marketing
      • 21.1 Marketing Approaches
      • 21.2 Technical Marketing
      • 21.3 Content Marketing
      • 21.4 Word of Mouth
      • 21.5 Conclusion
  • Appendices
    • Managing Packages Using a Monorepo
      • Monorepos - What Are They
      • Managing Separate Repositories
      • Conclusion
    • Customizing ESLint
      • Speeding up ESLint Execution
      • Skipping ESLint Rules
      • Setting Environment
      • Writing ESLint Plugins
      • ESLint Resources
      • Conclusion

Bundles that include this book

SurviveJS - React
SurviveJS - Webpack
SurviveJS - Maintenance
3 Books
$50.97
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$34.99
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About the Authors

Juho Vepsäläinen
Juho Vepsäläinen

Juho Vepsäläinen is behind the SurviveJS effort. In addition to being a core developer of webpack, I have been active in the open source scene since the early 2000s. Blue Arrow Awards winner.

Artem Sapegin
Artem Sapegin

Frontend developer living in Berlin, passionate photographer and owner of two crazy dogs. Creator of React Styleguidist.

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