Functional Programming for the Object-Oriented Programmer

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About the Book

This book serves three overlapping audiences:

  • People who'd like to learn functional programming because they want to be ready if such languages become part of the mainstream.
  • People who'll be working in an object-oriented language but want to use some functional programming idioms and tricks of the trade in their projects.
  • People with less specific goals, but who believe that learning languages that conceptualize problems and solutions in radically different ways will make them better programmers in general.

The book uses Clojure, a popular functional language that runs on the Java Virtual Machine. It contains many exercises and their solutions.

For more about what the book covers, see the sample PDF. It includes the Introduction, the first chapter, and the glossary.

The book is "feature complete", but there will be bug fixes and improvements to the explanations over the next few months.

Praise

"This book, written by Brian Marick, is important. Indeed, it may be necessary. We need something to bridge the gap between the huge population of OO programmers, and the growing need for functional programmers. I’ve seen nothing else that fills this need so well."

— From a review by Robert "Uncle Bob" Martin

"@marick is blowing my mind with #fp_oo, building OO on top of FP."

Larry Staton Jr.

"I have an understanding of monads for the first time thanks to @marick and his awesome book"

Dave Kincaid

"'Functional Programming for the OO Programmer' by @marick features the best introduction to Clojure I've read so far."

Sebastian Benz

"Bought #fp_oo by @marick today. Chapter 1 is the best #clojure intro I have read"

Adrian Mowat

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Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • Prerequisites
  • The flow of the book
  • About the exercises
  • About the cover
  • About links
  • There is a glossary
  • Getting help
  • Notes to reviewers
  • Changes to earlier versions
  • Acknowledgments
  • Advertisement
  • 1 Just Enough Clojure
  • 1.1 Installing Clojure
  • 1.2 Working with Clojure
  • 1.3 The Read-Eval-Print Loop
  • 1.4 A note on terminology: “value”
  • 1.5 Functions are values
  • 1.6 Evaluation is substitution
  • 1.7 Making functions
  • 1.8 More substitution as evaluation
  • 1.9 Naming things
  • 1.10 Lists
  • 1.11 Vectors
  • 1.12 Vector? List? Who cares?
  • 1.13 More on evaluation and quoting
  • 1.14 Conditionals
  • 1.15 Rest arguments
  • 1.16 Explicitly applying functions
  • 1.17 Loops
  • 1.18 More exercises
  • I Embedding an Object-Oriented Language
  • 2 Objects as a Software-Mediated Consensual Hallucination
  • 3 A Barely Believable Object
  • 3.1 Maps
  • 3.2 I present to you an object
  • 3.3 The class begins as documentation
  • 3.4 Exercises
  • 4 All the Class in a Constructor
  • 4.1 One exercise
  • 5 Moving the Class Out of the Constructor
  • 5.1 Let
  • 5.2 Implementing instance creation
  • 5.3 Message dispatch
  • 5.4 Exercises
  • 6 Inheritance (and Recursion)
  • 6.1 Assertions
  • 6.2 Method dispatch
  • 6.3 Recursion
  • 6.4 Exercises
  • 6.5 Finishing up
  • 6.6 Choose your own adventure
  • II The Elements of Functional Style
  • 7 Basic Datatypes that Flow through Functions
  • 7.1 The problem
  • 7.2 The general strategy
  • 7.3 Sets
  • 7.4 Annotating maps
  • 7.5 The arrow operator, ->
  • 7.6 Processing sequences of maps
  • 7.7 Destructuring arguments
  • 7.8 Finishing up
  • 7.9 Exercises
  • 7.10 Avoiding argument passing
  • 7.11 Information hiding
  • 8 Embedding Functional Code in an OO Codebase
  • 8.1 Tasty functional nuggets in a tub of OO ice-cream
  • 8.2 Object-relational mapping: threat or menace?
  • 8.3 The big picture
  • 9 Functions That Make Functions
  • 9.1 Closing over values
  • 9.2 Lifting functions
  • 9.3 Point-free definitions
  • 9.4 Exercises
  • 9.5 Higher-order functions from the object-oriented perspective
  • 10 Branching and Looping in Dataflow Style
  • 10.1 That pesky nil again
  • 10.2 Continuation-passing style
  • 10.3 Exercises
  • 10.4 Expansions in evaluation
  • 10.5 Extending continuation-passing style
  • 10.6 Monads as data-driven extended continuation-passing style
  • 10.7 A peek at metadata
  • 10.8 Cond
  • 10.9 Exercises
  • 10.10 Lifting functions with monads
  • 10.11 Turning loops into straight-line flows
  • 10.12 Exercises
  • 10.13 Choose your own adventure
  • 11 Pretending State is Mutable
  • 11.1 Trees
  • 11.2 Zippers
  • 11.3 The do special form
  • 11.4 A little problem of self-reference
  • 11.5 Exercises
  • 11.6 Editing trees
  • 11.7 Zipper functions
  • 11.8 Exercises
  • 11.9 Thinking about zippers
  • 11.10 Implementing zippers
  • 11.11 The Worm Ouroborous
  • 12 Pushing Bookkeeping into the Runtime: Laziness and Immutability
  • 12.1 Laziness
  • 12.2 Infinite data
  • 12.3 Implementing your own lazy sequences
  • 12.4 Exercises
  • 12.5 Turning the external world into a lazy sequence
  • 12.6 Exercises
  • 12.7 Immutability through structure sharing
  • 12.8 Implications for the object-oriented programmer
  • 13 Pattern Matching
  • 13.1 Moving conditionals into arguments
  • 13.2 Sequence structure
  • 13.3 Arbitrary arguments
  • 13.4 Summary
  • 13.5 Exercises
  • 14 Generic Functions
  • 14.1 Generic functions for object-oriented programming
  • 14.2 A digression on verbs
  • 14.3 Polymorphism without a privileged argument
  • 14.4 On your own
  • III Coda
  • IV A Mite More on Monads (Optional)
  • 15 Implementing the Sequence Monad
  • 15.1 Monadic values and binding values
  • 15.2 Defining the monad
  • 15.3 The monad bestiary
  • 15.4 Exercise
  • 15.5 Refactoring to a monad transformer
  • 16 Functions as Monadic Values
  • 16.1 A function wrapper
  • 16.2 A counting monad
  • 16.3 Exercises
  • 16.4 The State monad
  • 16.5 Exercises
  • V To Ruby… And Beyond! (Optional)
  • 17 The Class as an Object
  • 17.1 The wrong implementation
  • 17.2 A better implementation
  • 17.3 The story so far
  • 17.4 Exercises
  • 18 The Class That Makes Classes
  • 18.1 Klass in pictures (version 1)
  • 18.2 The first Klass implementation
  • 18.3 Class-defining functions
  • 18.4 Klass in pictures (version 2)
  • 18.5 The revised Klass implementation
  • 18.6 Exercises
  • 19 Multiple Inheritance, Ruby-style
  • 19.1 New terminology
  • 19.2 How modules work
  • 19.3 How dispatch works with modules
  • 19.4 Adding Module to the class structure
  • 19.5 Exercises
  • 20 Dynamic Scoping and send-super
  • 20.1 Dynamic scope
  • 20.2 Implicit this
  • 20.3 Ruby’s super
  • 20.4 A design
  • 20.5 Exercises
  • 21 Making an Object out of a Message in Transit
  • 21.1 The map
  • 21.2 The programmer interface
  • 21.3 Implementation
  • 21.4 Exercises
  • VI Glossary

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