Web Development with Java and JSF
Web Development with Java and JSF

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Web Development with Java and JSF

Last updated on 2016-11-25

About the Book

The web is everywhere. And today's software often uses a web interface to use it from any place - via intranet within a company or via internet worldwide. Java is a well established programming language, not only for business critical applications, but for web applications too. This way, it is a good choice to use Java for the web.

JavaServer Faces is a web framework built upon the Java Servlet technology which makes it easy to construct a UI from a set of reusable UI components. It provides a simple model for wiring client-generated events to server-side application code. Depending on the developers preference, the client side can be constructed using tags which hides most of that HTML stuff, or it can build up almost with HTML, flavored with some small special markers.

This book introduces you to web development using Java and JSF, which you can use to build complete, small to comprehensive size applications. The goal of this book is to create a good foundation in web development and take the reader to a more sophisticated level. To pursue this goal, related Java EE technologies like persistence (JPA), CDI, container based security, WebSockets, test tools and more are discussed.

For a couple of experienced [Java SE] developers, web development still feels a bit unusual. It's not possible to develop an application by just one programming language, controlling everything by just one program (maybe consisting of a bunch of loosely coupled tiers). Browser and application, these are apparently two distinct worlds. The browser just queries some content from a server and displays it at the client and then forgets about the connection. Thus, to continue with the application, the client must include some identifier into the next call to enable the server remembering and restoring the last state. JSF as part of the Java universe is made for this. But you need more. For those readers, who are new to the web, this book offers some additional chapters covering the basics of HTML, CSS, JavaScript and other.

This is a living book. From time to time I'm going to add or update content. Once purchased, you are able to download all future updates without extra charge.

Enjoy reading and stay tuned!

Table of Contents

  •  
    • Preliminary note
      • One year later…
    • Cover image
    • Acknowledgements
    • Preface
    • Contributors
      • Pratap Chatterjee
      • Constantin Marian Alin
      • Anghel Leonard
    • About the Author
    • About this book
      • Conventions
      • Links
      • Errors and typos
      • Copyright
  • Part I: TinyCalculator
    • 1. TinyCalculator
      • 1.1 Creating the application
      • 1.2 TinyCalculator briefly explained
        • 1.2.1 Managed Bean
        • 1.2.2 The page
        • 1.2.3 Relationship
      • 1.3 Summary
    • 2. Foundations
      • 2.1 Web Application
      • 2.2 HTTP
      • 2.3 HTML
      • 2.4 CSS
      • 2.5 JavaScript
      • 2.6 Java
      • 2.7 Maven
      • 2.8 Selenium & Arquillian
      • 2.9 Servlet
      • 2.10 Deployment
      • 2.11 Summary
    • 3. JavaServer Faces
      • 3.1 View Definition Language
      • 3.2 Web vs. traditional application
      • 3.3 JSF life-cycle overview
      • 3.4 JSF Namespaces and Tags
      • 3.5 Component tree
      • 3.6 Navigation
      • 3.7 Summary
    • 4. Expression Language
      • 4.1 Value Expression
        • 4.1.1 Operators
        • 4.1.2 Explanation
        • 4.1.3 Dot and Square Bracket
      • 4.2 Method Expression
      • 4.3 Implicit objects
      • 4.4 Summary
    • 5. HTML Friendly Markup
      • 5.1 Summary
    • 6. Configuration files
      • 6.1 pom.xml
      • 6.2 web.xml
      • 6.3 faces-config.xml
      • 6.4 beans.xml
      • 6.5 persistence.xml
      • 6.6 glassfish-resources.xml
      • 6.7 glassfish-web.xml
      • 6.8 Other files
      • 6.9 Summary
    • 7. Testing with Selenium
      • 7.1 Selenium overview
      • 7.2 Preparing TinyCalculator
      • 7.3 Creating the test
      • 7.4 Unit Test without Selenium
      • 7.5 Summary
    • 8. Recap TinyCalculator
  • Part II: Books
    • 9. Books
      • 9.1 Books requirements
      • 9.2 Development order
      • 9.3 Project creation
      • 9.4 Summary
    • 10. Starting Books
      • 10.1 Page layout
        • 10.1.1 HTML structure
        • 10.1.2 Basic Styling with CSS
      • 10.2 Design first data model
      • 10.3 First Dialogue (Repeating structure)
    • 11. Java Persistence API
      • 11.1 Entities
      • 11.2 Persistence Unit
        • 11.2.1 Data Source
        • 11.2.2 Entity Manager
      • 11.3 Service class
        • 11.3.1 Using the CategoryService / Injection
    • 12. JSF Templating
      • 12.1 Templating books
      • 12.2 Summary
    • 13. Becoming International
      • 13.1 Internationalization and Localization
      • 13.2 Welcome Page
        • 13.2.1 Message Bundle
        • 13.2.2 Innocent welcome page implementation
        • 13.2.3 Chop into paragraphs and use <ui:repeat>
      • 13.3 Language switcher
      • 13.4 Localized content
        • 13.4.1 Preparing the administer area
        • 13.4.2 Include into page
        • 13.4.3 Topics
        • 13.4.4 Enhancing the category entity
        • 13.4.5 The category translation page
      • 13.5 Summary
    • 14. Bean Validation
      • 14.1 Book entity
      • 14.2 Book editor
      • 14.3 Summary
    • 15. Context and Dependency Injection
      • 15.1 Summary
    • 16. Conversation Scope
      • 16.1 Multi Page Editor
      • 16.2 Post and Get navigation
      • 16.3 Begin and end the conversation
      • 16.4 Summary
    • 17. Links
    • 18. Responsive Design
      • 18.1 Getting pixel layouts responsive
      • 18.2 Calculating sizes
      • 18.3 Mobile first, Desktop first
      • 18.4 Summary
    • 19. Summary and perspective
  • Part III: Intermezzo
    • 20. Intermezzo
    • 21. JSF Lifecycle revised
    • 22. Repetitive Structures
      • 22.1 Tag handler vs. component
      • 22.2 Performance issues
      • 22.3 Summary
    • 23. Preparing for Java EE 8
      • 23.1 Current evolution
      • 23.2 Upgrade the application server
      • 23.3 Payara server
      • 23.4 Summary
  • Part IV: Alumni
    • 24. Alumni
      • 24.1 Preparing the application
      • 24.2 Registration Form
      • 24.3 Summary
    • 25. Validation
      • 25.1 Bean Validation
        • 25.1.1 Step by step tutorial to create a customize message
        • 25.1.2 Details of customized messages
        • 25.1.3 Null handling
      • 25.2 Validation method
      • 25.3 Validator
      • 25.4 Multi component validation
      • 25.5 Self made
      • 25.6 Summary
    • 26. AJAX
      • 26.1 Summary
    • 27. Building Composite Components
      • 27.1 Transforming into a composition
      • 27.2 Enable child element for the composition
      • 27.3 Pass in validation method
      • 27.4 Ubiquitous input component
      • 27.5 Summary
    • 28. Secure Passwords
      • 28.1 Security issues and mitigation
      • 28.2 Password algorithm
      • 28.3 Summary
    • 29. Data Facade
      • 29.1 Abstract Data Service
      • 29.2 Concrete facade
      • 29.3 Account entity
      • 29.4 Summary
    • 30. Activation Mail
      • 30.1 Hard coded
      • 30.2 Mail session
      • 30.3 Send activation
      • 30.4 Summary
    • 31. Cleanup
      • 31.1 Scheduler
      • 31.2 Delete query
      • 31.3 Becoming asynchronous
      • 31.4 Summary
    • 32. Authentication and Authorization
      • 32.1 Security basics
      • 32.2 Basic authentication and fileRealm
      • 32.3 Form login
      • 32.4 Programmatic login
        • 32.4.1 Log out
      • 32.5 jdbcRealm
      • 32.6 Custom Realm
      • 32.7 Summary
    • 33. Account Handling
      • 33.1 Micro service
      • 33.2 Account Service
      • 33.3 Testing
      • 33.4 Summary
    • 34. < JASPIC >
    • 35. Restricted access
    • 36. Classroom chat (or the use of WebSockets)
      • 36.1 Overview / Goals
      • 36.2 To be spoilt for choice (which protocol to use?)
        • 36.2.1 Recap HTTP
        • 36.2.2 Alternatives
      • 36.3 WebSocket
        • 36.3.1 Endpoint
        • 36.3.2 Simple chat
      • 36.4 ClassRoom chat
      • 36.5 Summary and prospect
    • 37. JSF 2.3 websocket
      • 37.1 Summary
    • 38. Changing Look and Feel
      • 38.1 Resource library
      • 38.2 Immediately change the look and feel
      • 38.3 Read from resources
      • 38.4 Summary
    • 39. Constants handling
      • 39.1 Navigation by Strings
      • 39.2 Importing constants
      • 39.3 Summary
  • Part V: Beyond one’s own nose
    • 40. Overview
    • 41. < Other JSF Libraries >
    • 42. < Web Services >
    • 43. < Representational State Transfer (REST) >
    • 44. Vaadin
    • 45. < AngularJS >
  • Appendix
    • HTML
      • HTML structure
      • HTML header
      • HTML body
        • Page and text structure, link
        • Form & Input
        • Table
      • Tag completion / tag guessing
    • Cascadind Style Sheets (CSS)
      • Selectors
        • Type selector
        • Id selector
        • Class selector
        • Attribute selector
        • Nesting selector
        • Sibling Selector
      • Box model
      • Enhanced styling
    • Tag libraries
      • Pass through elements
      • JSF Core library
      • JSF HTML library
        • Common attributes
      • Facelet Templating tag library
      • Composite Component tag library
      • Pass through attributes
      • JSP Standard Tag Library (JSTL)
      • JSTL functions
    • Programming Style
    • Bibliography
  • Notes

About the Author

Michael Müller
Michael Müller

Michael Müller is an IT professional with more than 30 years of experience including about 25 years in the healthcare sector. During this time, he has worked in different areas, especially project and product management, consulting, and software development. He gained international knowledge not only by targeting international markets, but also by leading external teams (from Eastern Europe and India).

Currently, he is the head of software development at the German DRG institute (http://inek.org). In this role, he is responsible for web, Java, and .NET projects. Web projects are preferably built with Java technologies such as JSF, and JavaScript.

Michael is a JSF professional user and a member of the JSR 344 (JSF) expert group.

He frequently reads books and writes reviews as well as technical papers, which are mostly published in German-printed magazines and on his website at http://it-rezension.de. Besides that, he irregular blogs about software development at http://blog.mueller-bruehl.de.

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