Getting to Know IntelliJ IDEA

Getting to Know IntelliJ IDEA

Level up your IntelliJ IDEA knowledge so that you can focus on doing what you do best.

About the Book

Tips and tricks designed to help you level up, whether you're just starting with IntelliJ IDEA or you've been a user for a while. Written with junior and senior developers in mind.

About the Authors

Trisha Gee
Trisha Gee

Trisha a Java Champion and the Lead Java Advocate at JetBrains. Trisha has developed Java applications for a range of industries of all sizes, including finance, manufacturing and non-profit. She has expertise in Java high performance systems and dabbles with Open Source development. Trisha values helping all developers level up their career and skills at every step of their journey.

Helen Scott
Helen Scott

Helen is passionate about all things technology and loves working with the development community to help them be awesome. Helen believes that content creation and communication are the best ways to engage with the community and help everyone learn together.

Helen has worked at numerous software companies and has experienced the highs and lows of the software development cycle at all stages. Helen loves to learn new tools and technologies and share that journey of exploration.

Helen has a Computer Science degree from The University of Sussex and a Diploma in Technical Communications from Sheffield Hallam University.

Table of Contents

  • Dedication
  • About the Authors
    • Helen Scott
    • Trisha Gee
    • Why We Wrote This Book
  • Getting the most from this book
    • Who should read this book
    • Signposts to Look Out For
    • A Note About Shortcuts
    • Feedback
  • Acknowledgements
    • Technical Reviewers
    • Cover Design
  • Part I: Getting to Know IntelliJ IDEA
    • Chapter 1. How Can IntelliJ IDEA Help You?
    • Chapter 2. The IntelliJ IDEA Mindset
      • 2.1. Always Green
      • 2.2. Keyboard First
      • 2.3. In the Flow
    • Chapter 3. Installing IntelliJ IDEA
    • Chapter 4. IntelliJ IDEA Out of the Box
      • 4.1. Welcome Screen
      • 4.2. Tip of the Day
      • 4.3. New Feature Notifications
      • 4.4. Balloon Notifications
      • 4.5. Toolbar Buttons
      • 4.6. Tool Windows
      • 4.7. Navigation Bar
      • 4.8. Editor Tabs
      • 4.9. Breadcrumbs
      • 4.10. Status Bar
      • 4.11. Dialogs
      • 4.12. After Upgrading
    • Chapter 5. Where to Look
      • 5.1. In The Editor
      • 5.2. In Your Wider Project
    • Chapter 6. How IntelliJ IDEA Sees Your Project
      • 6.1. IntelliJ IDEA’s Internal Map
      • 6.2. What is an IntelliJ IDEA Project?
      • 6.3. Finding Your Code
      • 6.4. Projects and Workspaces
      • 6.5. Establishing Version Control Status
      • 6.6. IntelliJ IDEA Ultimate Framework support
      • 6.7. Plugins and What They Give You
  • Part II: Working with Code
    • Chapter 7. Writing Code in IntelliJ IDEA
    • Chapter 8. Staying in the flow with code completion & generation
      • 8.1. Basic completion
      • 8.2. Smart completion
      • 8.3. Postfix completion
      • 8.4. Complete statement
      • 8.5. Live templates
      • 8.6. Generate new (file templates)
      • 8.7. Generate from error or warning
    • Chapter 9. Always Green with Intelligent Suggestions
      • 9.1. How can I tell if IntelliJ IDEA has a suggestion?
      • 9.2. Fix Errors
      • 9.3. Improve Code
      • 9.4. Change Code
      • 9.5. Spelling
    • Chapter 10. Think "Keyboard First" with Editor tips
      • 10.1. Must Have Shortcuts
      • 10.2. Selecting Code
      • 10.3. Convenience Shortcuts
      • 10.4. Formatting
      • 10.5. Arranging Your Code
    • Chapter 11. How to Move Through Your Code
      • 11.1. Finding Anything
      • 11.2. Viewing and Opening Recent Files
      • 11.3. Viewing and Moving to Recent Locations
      • 11.4. Moving Forward and Backward through code
      • 11.5. Moving between your Class and its Test
      • 11.6. Finding Where This Code is Used
    • Chapter 12. Working with Dependencies
      • 12.1. Understanding the terminology
      • 12.2. Seeing your Project’s Dependencies
      • 12.3. Adding dependencies with Maven or Gradle
      • 12.4. Updating Dependencies with Maven or Gradle
      • 12.5. Adding Dependencies Without a dependency management tool
    • Chapter 13. Keeping Track of Code Changes
    • Chapter 14. Enable Version Control (Git)
      • 14.1. Git Log Window
      • 14.2. What happens when you change code under version control
      • 14.3. What to look for when you’re ready to commit code
      • 14.4. Experimenting in a safe place (branching)
      • 14.5. Merging your successful experiment back into the main branch
      • 14.6. Deleting an unsuccessful experiment, or unused branch
      • 14.7. Going back to an older version of your file
      • 14.8. Your last line of defence
      • 14.9. Getting code from version control (GitHub)
    • Chapter 15. Reading Code
      • 15.1. Inlay Hints
      • 15.2. Quick Definition and Documentation
      • 15.3. Javadocs
      • 15.4. Code Folding
      • 15.5. Code Analysis
      • 15.6. Language Injection
      • 15.7. Navigation
      • 15.8. Version Control
      • 15.9. Automated tests
  • Part III: Running, Debugging and Testing
    • Chapter 16. Running Your Code
    • Chapter 17. Getting Started with Debugging
      • 17.1. In Summary
    • Chapter 18. Getting Started with Testing
      • 18.1. A Quick Discussion of Types of Testing
    • Chapter 19. Combining Testing and Debugging
    • Chapter 20. Running with Build Tools
    • Chapter 21. Understanding what you’re running
      • 21.1. What is a Run Configuration?
      • 21.2. How do I…​ pass arguments into my application?
      • 21.3. How do I…​ set environment variables?
      • 21.4. How do I…​ set JVM arguments?
      • 21.5. How do I…​ share my settings with my team?
      • 21.6. Run Anything
  • Part IV: IntelliJ IDEA Essentials
    • Chapter 22. What an IDE gives you
    • Chapter 23. Refactoring your code
      • 23.1. Renaming
      • 23.2. Extracting and Inlining
      • 23.3. Change a method’s signature
      • 23.4. Move statement
      • 23.5. Data flow analysis
      • 23.6. Safe delete
      • 23.7. Language level migration
      • 23.8. Using Inspections and intentions
      • 23.9. Intentions
    • Chapter 24. Formatting your code
      • 24.1. Formatting whole or part of a file
      • 24.2. Code Format Settings
      • 24.3. Using Alt+Enter to see and change relevant code style settings
      • 24.4. Using EditorConfig files
      • 24.5. Reformat on commit
      • 24.6. Rearranging code in your classes
    • Chapter 25. Using Multiple Clipboards
    • Chapter 26. Diving into debugging
      • 26.1. Viewing specific variable interaction by setting breakpoints
      • 26.2. Tailoring the debugger for my use case
      • 26.3. Viewing data from different parts of the application
      • 26.4. Running "What if?" scenarios in my debugger
    • Chapter 27. Expanding on Testing
    • Chapter 28. How much of my code is being tested?
      • 28.1. What are you really running?
      • 28.2. Navigating between my code and test code
      • 28.3. Testing with continuous integration
      • 28.4. Testing callouts for Maven and Gradle
      • 28.5. When is testing code 'unused'?
    • Chapter 29. Why do you need dependency management?
      • 29.1. Accessing your build tool
      • 29.2. Importing a project that uses a build tool
      • 29.3. Building a project that uses a build tool
      • 29.4. Compiling and running a project that uses a build tool
      • 29.5. Looking at your build output
      • 29.6. Where to see your dependencies
      • 29.7. Using the build tool window
      • 29.8. Making Changes to your Build Configuration
    • Chapter 30. Version Control Matters
      • 30.1. Why Work with a Version Control System
      • 30.2. The Git Tool Window
      • 30.3. Merge or Rebase
    • Chapter 31. Your .gitignore file
      • 31.1. Files to exclude based on your build tool
      • 31.2. Additional IntelliJ IDEA setting files to add to your .gitignore file
    • Chapter 32. Local history
    • Chapter 33. TODOs
    • Chapter 34. Code With Me
      • 34.1. Why Code With Me?
      • 34.2. Using Code With Me
    • Chapter 35. Installing Plugins
    • Chapter 36. IntelliJ IDEA and Java
    • Chapter 37. The Structure of Your Project
      • 37.1. The Language Level in your Project
      • 37.2. Modules in your Project
    • Chapter 38. Looking in your .idea folder
      • 38.1. .idea folder contents
    • Chapter 39. Changing IntelliJ IDEA Settings
      • 39.1. Preferences/Settings dialog
      • 39.2. Preferences/Settings in the Search Everywhere dialog
    • Chapter 40. Getting Help
      • 40.1. Online Help
      • 40.2. IntelliJ IDEA YouTube
      • 40.3. IntelliJ IDEA Blog
      • 40.4. IntelliJ IDEA Community Forums
      • 40.5. StackOverflow
      • 40.6. YouTrack
    • Chapter 41. Getting to Know IntelliJ IDEA Summary
  • Appendix A: Background & History
    • A.1. What are the differences between the Community and Ultimate versions?
    • A.2. Who makes IntelliJ IDEA?
  • Appendix B: Top keyboard shortcuts
  • Chapter 42. "Must Know" Shortcuts
    • 42.1. Context Actions
    • 42.2. Search Everywhere
    • 42.3. Reset
  • Chapter 43. Coding
    • 43.1. Smart Completion
    • 43.2. Complete Current Statement
    • 43.3. Navigate to Errors and Warnings
    • 43.4. Format File
  • Chapter 44. Navigation
    • 44.1. Recent Files
    • 44.2. Recent Locations
  • Chapter 45. Running and Debugging
    • 45.1. Run Anything
    • 45.2. Terminate Process
  • Chapter 46. How do I configure my own shortcuts and abbreviations?
  • Chapter 47. Summary

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