C++20
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C++20

About the Book

My book C++20 is both: a tutorial and a reference for the C++20 standard. It teaches you C++20 and provides you with the details of this new thrilling C++ standard. The thrilling factor is mainly due to the big four of C++20.

  • Concepts change the way we think and program templates. They are semantic categories for the template parameters and enable you to express your intention directly in the type system. If something goes wrong, you get a clear error message.
  • The new ranges library enables it to perform algorithms directly on the container, compose the algorithm with the pipe symbol, and apply them to infinite data streams.
  • Thanks to coroutines, asynchronous programming in C++ becomes mainstream. Coroutines are the base for cooperative tasks, event loops, infinite data streams, or pipelines.
  • Modules overcome the restrictions of header files. They promise a lot. For example, the separation of header and source files becomes as obsolete as the preprocessor. In the end, we have faster built time and an easier way to build packages.

About the Author

Rainer Grimm
Rainer Grimm

I've worked as a software architect, team lead, and instructor since 1999. In 2002, I created a further education round at my company. I have given training courses since 2002. My first tutorials were about proprietary management software, but soon after, I began teaching Python and C++. In my spare time, I like to write articles about C++, Python, and Haskell. I also like to speak at conferences. I publish weekly on my English blog https://www.modernescpp.com and the https://www.grimm-jaud.de/index.php/blog, hosted by Heise Developer.

Since 2016, I have been an independent instructor giving seminars about modern C++ and Python. I have published several books in various languages about modern C++ and in particular, concurrency. Due to my profession, I always search for the best way to teach modern C++.

My books "C++ 11 für Programmierer ", "C++" and "C++ Standardbibliothek kurz & gut" for the "kurz & gut" series were published by Pearson and O'Reilly. They are available in German, English, Korean, and Persian. In summer 2018 I published a new book on Leanpub: "Concurrency with Modern C++". This book is also available in German: "Modernes C++: Concurrency meistern".

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The Book

Includes:

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    All source code examples

  • PDF

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  • MOBI

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$33.00
Minimum price
$41.00
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C++20 Team Edition: Five Copies

Get five copies to the price of three. This package includes all code examples.

Includes:

  • extras
    Source code

    All source code examples

  • PDF

  • EPUB

  • MOBI

  • WEB

  • English

$99.00
Minimum price
$123.00
Suggested price

Bundles that include this book

$70.95
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Reader Testimonials

Sandor Dargo
Sandor Dargo

Senior Software Development Engineer at Amadeus

'C++ 20: Get the details' is exactly the book you need right now if you want to immerse yourself in the latest version of C++. It's a complete guide, Rainer doesn't only discuss the flagship features of C++20, but also every minor addition to the language. Luckily, the book includes tons of example code, so even if you don't have direct access yet to the latest compilers, you will have a very good idea of what you can expect from the different features. A highly recommended read!

Adrian Tam
Adrian Tam

Director of Data Science, Synechron Inc.

C++ has evolved a lot from its birth. With C++20, it is like a new language now. Surely this book is not a primer to teach you inheritance or overloading, but if you need to bring your C++ knowledge up to date, this is the right book. You will be surprised about the new features C++20 brought into C++. This book gives you clear explanations with concise examples. Its organization allows you to use it as a reference later. It can help you unleash the old language into its powerful future.

Harishankar Yadav
Harishankar Yadav

Full-time independent Trainer and Mentor for C++ and OOPs, Guidelines, and best practices.

A great work by Rainer and a fantastic book on C++20. With Lots of easy-to-understand, grasp code examples. I have never thought that I will have such a wonderful book covering everything about C++20 with great details and easy language. I am sure this book will change the perception about C++ at all levels of C++ programmers. A must-have book on C++20 on your desk.

Table of Contents

  •  
    • Reader Testimonials
    • Introduction
      • Conventions
        • Special Fonts
        • Special Boxes
      • Source Code
        • Compilation of the Programs
      • How should you read the Book?
      • Personal Notes
        • Acknowledgments
        • About Me
  • About C++
    • 1. Historical Context
      • 1.1 C++98
      • 1.2 C++03
      • 1.3 TR1
      • 1.4 C++11
      • 1.5 C++14
      • 1.6 C++17
    • 2. Standardization
      • 2.1 Stage 3
      • 2.2 Stage 2
      • 2.3 Stage 1
  • A Quick Overview of C++20
    • 3. C++20
      • 3.1 The Big Four
        • 3.1.1 Concepts
        • 3.1.2 Modules
        • 3.1.3 The Ranges Library
        • 3.1.4 Coroutines
      • 3.2 Core Language
        • 3.2.1 Three-Way Comparison Operator
        • 3.2.2 Designated Initialization
        • 3.2.3 consteval and constinit
        • 3.2.4 Template Improvements
        • 3.2.5 Lambda Improvements
        • 3.2.6 New Attributes
      • 3.3 The Standard Library
        • 3.3.1 std::span
        • 3.3.2 Container Improvements
        • 3.3.3 Arithmetic Utilities
        • 3.3.4 Calendar and Time Zones
        • 3.3.5 Formatting Library
      • 3.4 Concurrency
        • 3.4.1 Atomics
        • 3.4.2 Semaphores
        • 3.4.3 Latches and Barriers
        • 3.4.4 Cooperative Interruption
        • 3.4.5 std::jthread
        • 3.4.6 Synchronized Outputstreams
  • The Details
    • 4. Core Language
      • 4.1 Concepts
        • 4.1.1 Two Wrong Approaches
        • 4.1.2 Advantages of Concepts
        • 4.1.3 The long, long History
        • 4.1.4 Use of Concepts
        • 4.1.5 Constrained and Unconstrained Placeholders
        • 4.1.6 Abbreviated Function Templates
        • 4.1.7 Predefined Concepts
        • 4.1.8 Defining Concepts
        • 4.1.9 Application
      • 4.2 Modules
        • 4.2.1 Why do we need Modules?
        • 4.2.2 Advantages
        • 4.2.3 A First Example
        • 4.2.4 Compilation and Use
        • 4.2.5 Export
        • 4.2.6 Guidelines for a Module Structure
        • 4.2.7 Module Interface Unit and Module Implementation Unit
        • 4.2.8 Submodules and Module Partitions
        • 4.2.9 Templates in Modules
        • 4.2.10 Module Linkage
        • 4.2.11 Header Units
      • 4.3 Equality Comparison and Three-Way Comparison
        • 4.3.1 Comparison before C++20
        • 4.3.2 Comparison since C++20
        • 4.3.3 Comparison Categories
        • 4.3.4 Compiler-Generated Equality and Spaceship Operator
        • 4.3.5 Rewriting Expressions
        • 4.3.6 User-Defined and Auto-Generated Comparison Operators
      • 4.4 Designated Initialization
        • 4.4.1 Aggregate Initialization
        • 4.4.2 Named Initialization of Class Members
      • 4.5 consteval and constinit
        • 4.5.1 consteval
        • 4.5.2 constinit
        • 4.5.3 Function Execution
        • 4.5.4 Variable Initialization
        • 4.5.5 Solving the Static Initialization Order Fiasco
      • 4.6 Template Improvements
        • 4.6.1 Conditionally Explicit Constructor
        • 4.6.2 Non-Type Template Parameters
      • 4.7 Lambda Improvements
        • 4.7.1 Template Parameter for Lambdas
        • 4.7.2 Detection of the Implicit Copy of the this Pointer
        • 4.7.3 Lambdas in an Unevaluated Context and Stateless Lambdas can be Default-Constructed and Copy-Assigned
      • 4.8 New Attributes
        • 4.8.1 [[nodiscard("reason")]]
        • 4.8.2 [[likely]] and [[unlikely]]
        • 4.8.3 [[no_unique_address]]
      • 4.9 Further Improvements
        • 4.9.1 volatile
        • 4.9.2 Range-based for loop with Initializers
        • 4.9.3 Virtual constexpr function
        • 4.9.4 The new Character Type of UTF-8 Strings: char8_t
        • 4.9.5 using enum in Local Scopes
        • 4.9.6 Default Member Initializers for Bit Fields
    • 5. The Standard Library
      • 5.1 The Ranges Library
        • 5.1.1 Ranges
        • 5.1.2 Views
        • 5.1.3 Direct on the Container
        • 5.1.4 Function Composition
        • 5.1.5 Lazy Evaluation
        • 5.1.6 Define a View
        • 5.1.7 A Flavor of Python
      • 5.2 std::span
        • 5.2.1 Static versus Dynamic Extent
        • 5.2.2 Creation
        • 5.2.3 Automatically Deduces the Size of a Contiguous Sequence of Objects
        • 5.2.4 Modifying the Referenced Objects
        • 5.2.5 Addressing std::span Elements
        • 5.2.6 A Constant Range of Modifiable Elements
      • 5.3 Container Improvements
        • 5.3.1 constexpr Containers and Algorithms
        • 5.3.2 std::array
        • 5.3.3 Consistent Container Erasure
        • 5.3.4 contains for Associative Containers
        • 5.3.5 String prefix and suffix checking
      • 5.4 Arithmetic Utilities
        • 5.4.1 Safe Comparison of Integers
        • 5.4.2 Mathematical Constants
        • 5.4.3 Midpoint and Linear Interpolation
        • 5.4.4 Bit Manipulation
      • 5.5 Calendar and Time Zones
        • 5.5.1 Time of day
        • 5.5.2 Calendar Dates
        • 5.5.3 Time Zones
      • 5.6 Formatting Library
        • 5.6.1 Format String
        • 5.6.2 User-Defined Types
      • 5.7 Further Improvements
        • 5.7.1 std::bind_front
        • 5.7.2 std::is_constant_evaluated
        • 5.7.3 std::source_location
    • 6. Concurrency
      • 6.1 Coroutines
        • 6.1.1 A Generator Function
        • 6.1.2 Characteristics
        • 6.1.3 The Framework
        • 6.1.4 Awaitables and Awaiters
        • 6.1.5 The Workflows
        • 6.1.6 co_return
        • 6.1.7 co_yield
        • 6.1.8 co_await
      • 6.2 Atomics
        • 6.2.1 std::atomic_ref
        • 6.2.2 Atomic Smart Pointer
        • 6.2.3 std::atomic_flag Extensions
        • 6.2.4 std::atomic Extensions
      • 6.3 Semaphores
      • 6.4 Latches and Barriers
        • 6.4.1 std::latch
        • 6.4.2 std::barrier
      • 6.5 Cooperative Interruption
        • 6.5.1 std::stop_source
        • 6.5.2 std::stop_token
        • 6.5.3 std::stop_callback
      • 6.6 std::jthread
        • 6.6.1 Automatically Joining
        • 6.6.2 Cooperative Interruption of a std::jthread
      • 6.7 Synchronized Output Streams
    • 7. Case Studies
      • 7.1 Fast Synchronization of Threads
        • 7.1.1 Condition Variables
        • 7.1.2 std::atomic_flag
        • 7.1.3 std::atomic<bool>
        • 7.1.4 Semaphores
        • 7.1.5 All Numbers
      • 7.2 Variations of Futures
        • 7.2.1 A Lazy Future
        • 7.2.2 Execution on Another Thread
      • 7.3 Modification and Generalization of a Generator
        • 7.3.1 Modifications
        • 7.3.2 Generalization
      • 7.4 Various Job Workflows
        • 7.4.1 The Transparent Awaiter Workflow
        • 7.4.2 Automatically Resuming the Awaiter
        • 7.4.3 Automatically Resuming the Awaiter on a Separate Thread
  • Epilogue
  • Further Information
    • 8. C++23 and Beyond
      • 8.1 C++23
        • 8.1.1 The Coroutines Library
        • 8.1.2 Modularized Standard Library for Modules
        • 8.1.3 Executors
        • 8.1.4 The Network Library
      • 8.2 C++23 or Later
        • 8.2.1 Contracts
        • 8.2.2 Reflection
        • 8.2.3 Pattern Matching
      • 8.3 Further Information about C++23
    • 9. Feature Testing
    • 10. Glossary
      • 10.1 Callable
      • 10.2 Callable Unit
      • 10.3 Concurrency
      • 10.4 Critical Section
      • 10.5 Data Race
      • 10.6 Deadlock
      • 10.7 Eager Evaluation
      • 10.8 Executor
      • 10.9 Function Objects
      • 10.10 Lambda Expressions
      • 10.11 Lazy Evaluation
      • 10.12 Lock-free
      • 10.13 Lost Wakeup
      • 10.14 Math Laws
      • 10.15 Memory Location
      • 10.16 Memory Model
      • 10.17 Non-blocking
      • 10.18 Object
      • 10.19 Parallelism
      • 10.20 Predicate
      • 10.21 RAII
      • 10.22 Race Conditions
      • 10.23 Regular
      • 10.24 Scalar
      • 10.25 SemiRegular
      • 10.26 Spurious Wakeup
      • 10.27 The Big Four
      • 10.28 The Big Six
      • 10.29 Thread
      • 10.30 Time Complexity
      • 10.31 Translation Unit
      • 10.32 Undefined Behavior
    • Index

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