The book of OpenLayers 3
The book of OpenLayers 3
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The book of OpenLayers 3

This book is 100% complete

Completed on 2015-03-04

About the Book

Note, the book is compatible until Openlayers v3.4. Although overall the concepts are the same, sine v3.5 some changes was introduced in the API that are not reflected in the book.

OpenLayers3 is a new rewritten from scratch version of the library with a new design and API to offer an up to date tool, mobile ready out of the box and with improved performance.

Whether you are an experienced user or a new OpenLayers user, this book is a great reference to start learning the new concepts and API of the OpenLayers3.

The book is written as a mix between a beginner's book and a cookbook, so the reader can learn the concepts and see them in action through the extensive set of examples.

Learn how to create maps, add raster and vector layers, load data from different sources with different formats, work with the controls and interactions. After reading The book of OpenLayers3 you will be able to create any kind of map, from simple visualizations to complex map animations.

Note the source code for all the examples can be freely downloaded from GitHub thebookofopenlayers3 repository and also see it in action. You are welcome to contibute to.

About the Author

Antonio Santiago
Antonio Santiago

Antonio is a Computer Science professional with more than ten years of experience in designing and implementing systems.

Since the beginning of his professional life, his work has been always related to the world of meteorology while working for different companies as an employee or freelancer. He is experienced in development of systems to collect, transform, store, analyze, and visualize data and is actively interested in any GIS-related technology, with preference for data visualization.

His main fields of experience is the Java and JavaScript ecosystems, and he has also worked actively with many related web technologies while looking to improve the client side of web applications.

He is a firm believer in Software Engineering practices and is a follower of Agile methodologies, involving customers as a main key to the project’s success.

Table of Contents

  • About the book
    • Who is this book addressed ?
    • How is the book organized ?
    • Why I wrote this book?
    • The book cover
  • Before to start
    • A brief history
      • Born of OpenLayers
    • OpenLayers3
      • Features
    • Getting ready for programming with OpenLayer3
      • Basic code structure
      • How to debug an OpenLayers3 application
  • 1. The Map and the View
    • 1.1 The Map
      • 1.1.1 Map properties and methods
      • 1.1.2 What really happens when a map is created
      • 1.1.3 Different ways to render the map
    • 1.2 The View
      • 1.2.1 Controlling the view
      • 1.2.2 Resolutions and zoom levels
      • 1.2.3 The view properties
      • 1.2.4 Other useful methods
    • 1.3 Animations
      • 1.3.1 The animation functions
      • 1.3.2 The tween functions
      • 1.3.3 Applying animations
    • 1.4 The practice
      • 1.4.1 A basic map
        • 1.4.1.1 Goal
        • 1.4.1.2 How to do it…
        • 1.4.1.3 How it works…
      • 1.4.2 Moving around
        • 1.4.2.1 Goal
        • 1.4.2.2 How to do it…
        • 1.4.2.3 How it works…
      • 1.4.3 Animating the view
        • 1.4.3.1 Goal
        • 1.4.3.2 How to do it…
        • 1.4.3.3 How it works…
      • 1.4.4 Fit an extent
        • 1.4.4.1 Goal
        • 1.4.4.2 How to do it…
        • 1.4.4.3 How it works…
  • 2. Layers
    • 2.1 Managing the layers on the map
      • 2.1.1 Controlling the layer stack
    • 2.2 The base class
      • 2.2.1 Additional properties: Where is the layer name?
    • 2.3 The layer hierarchy
      • 2.3.1 Layer Groups
        • 2.3.1.1 Working with layer groups
      • 2.3.2 Tiled layers
      • 2.3.3 Image layers
      • 2.3.4 Vector layers
        • 2.3.4.1 Heatmap layer
    • 2.4 The practice
      • 2.4.1 Adding and removing layers
        • 2.4.1.1 Goal
        • 2.4.1.2 How to do it…
        • 2.4.1.3 How it works…
      • 2.4.2 Raise and lower layers in the layer stack
        • 2.4.2.1 Goal
        • 2.4.2.2 How to do it…
        • 2.4.2.3 How it works…
      • 2.4.3 Layer groups
        • 2.4.3.1 Goal
        • 2.4.3.2 How to do it…
        • 2.4.3.3 How it works…
      • 2.4.4 Image layer
        • 2.4.4.1 Goal
        • 2.4.4.2 How to do it…
        • 2.4.4.3 How it works…
      • 2.4.5 Visualizing layers depending on resolution
        • 2.4.5.1 Goal
        • 2.4.5.2 How to do it…
        • 2.4.5.3 How it works…
      • 2.4.6 A heatmap with the world’s cities density
        • 2.4.6.1 Goal
        • 2.4.6.2 How to do it…
        • 2.4.6.3 How it works…
  • 3. Data sources and formats
    • 3.1 The root source class
    • 3.2 Raster sources
      • 3.2.1 Introducing the raster hierarchy
      • 3.2.2 Tile grids
      • 3.2.3 Sources to access tile providers
        • 3.2.3.1 OpenStreetMap
        • 3.2.3.2 MapQuest and Stamen
        • 3.2.3.3 Bing Maps
      • 3.2.4 Sources to access OGC compliant servers
        • 3.2.4.1 Requesting a WMS server
          • 3.2.4.1.1 Single image query
          • 3.2.4.1.2 Tiled query
          • 3.2.4.1.3 Using WMS parameters
          • 3.2.4.1.4 Reading WMS server capabilities
        • 3.2.4.2 Loading tiles from a WMTS server
      • 3.2.5 Other raster sources
        • 3.2.5.1 Loading an static image
        • 3.2.5.2 Using a HTML5 canvas as source
    • 3.3 Vector sources and formats
      • 3.3.1 Introducing vector source and format hierarchies
      • 3.3.2 Understanding the StaticVector based classes
      • 3.3.3 Understanding the ServerVector class
      • 3.3.4 Loading vector tiles
      • 3.3.5 Be aware with the Same Domain Policy
      • 3.3.6 Rendering vector data as raster
      • 3.3.7 Working with format classes
    • 3.4 The practice
      • 3.4.1 Tile providers
        • 3.4.1.1 Goal
        • 3.4.1.2 How to do it…
        • 3.4.1.3 How it works…
      • 3.4.2 Reading WMS capabilities
        • 3.4.2.1 Goal
        • 3.4.2.2 How to do it…
        • 3.4.2.3 How it works…
        • 3.4.2.4 See also
      • 3.4.3 Loading data from a WMS server
        • 3.4.3.1 Goal
        • 3.4.3.2 How to do it…
        • 3.4.3.3 How it works…
        • 3.4.3.4 See also
      • 3.4.4 Requesting WMTS server
        • 3.4.4.1 Goal
        • 3.4.4.2 How to do it…
        • 3.4.4.3 How it works…
      • 3.4.5 Different ways to load data using a vector source
        • 3.4.5.1 Goal
        • 3.4.5.2 How to do it…
        • 3.4.5.3 How it works…
        • 3.4.5.4 There is more…
        • 3.4.5.5 See also
      • 3.4.6 Working with ImageCanvas
        • 3.4.6.1 Goal
        • 3.4.6.2 How to do it…
        • 3.4.6.3 How it works…
      • 3.4.7 Rendering vector data as raster
        • 3.4.7.1 Goal
        • 3.4.7.2 How to do it…
        • 3.4.7.3 How it works…
      • 3.4.8 Requesting data from a WFS server with and without JSONP
        • 3.4.8.1 Goal
        • 3.4.8.2 How to do it…
        • 3.4.8.3 How it works…
        • 3.4.8.4 See also
      • 3.4.9 Working with loading strategies
        • 3.4.9.1 Goal
        • 3.4.9.2 How to do it…
        • 3.4.9.3 How it works…
        • 3.4.9.4 See also
      • 3.4.10 Reading and writing features through the source class
        • 3.4.10.1 Goal
        • 3.4.10.2 How to do it…
        • 3.4.10.3 How it works…
  • 4. Vector layers
    • 4.1 Introducing features, geometries and styles
    • 4.2 Playing with geometries
    • 4.3 Creating features by hand
    • 4.4 Styling features
      • 4.4.1 Using icons to style features
      • 4.4.2 Working with text
      • 4.4.3 Applying styles to layers and features
        • 4.4.3.1 Understanding the style functions
    • 4.5 Managing features
      • 4.5.1 A word about events
    • 4.6 The practice
      • 4.6.1 Playing with geometries
        • 4.6.1.1 Goal
        • 4.6.1.2 How to do it…
        • 4.6.1.3 How it works…
        • 4.6.1.4 See also
      • 4.6.2 Creating features programmatically
        • 4.6.2.1 Goal
        • 4.6.2.2 How to do it…
        • 4.6.2.3 How it works…
        • 4.6.2.4 See also
      • 4.6.3 Basic styling
        • 4.6.3.1 Goal
        • 4.6.3.2 How to do it…
        • 4.6.3.3 How it works…
        • 4.6.3.4 See also
      • 4.6.4 Markers: Styling features with icons
        • 4.6.4.1 Goal
        • 4.6.4.2 How to do it…
        • 4.6.4.3 How it works…
        • 4.6.4.4 See also
      • 4.6.5 Using text to style features
        • 4.6.5.1 Goal
        • 4.6.5.2 How to do it…
        • 4.6.5.3 How it works…
        • 4.6.5.4 See also
      • 4.6.6 Working with style functions
        • 4.6.6.1 Goal
        • 4.6.6.2 How to do it…
        • 4.6.6.3 How it works…
        • 4.6.6.4 See also
      • 4.6.7 Managing features
        • 4.6.7.1 Goal
        • 4.6.7.2 How to do it…
        • 4.6.7.3 How it works…
        • 4.6.7.4 See also
  • 5. Events, listeners and properties
    • 5.1 Introducing event driven paradigm in OpenLayers3
    • 5.2 Where the events and listeners comes from?
      • 5.2.1 Listening for changes in ol.Observable instances
    • 5.3 Working with object properties
      • 5.3.1 Events in the ol.Object properties
      • 5.3.2 Binding properties between objects
    • 5.4 OpenLayers3 components events
      • 5.4.1 A word about ol.source.Source events
    • 5.5 The practice
      • 5.5.1 Events, listeners and properties
        • 5.5.1.1 Goal
        • 5.5.1.2 How to do it…
        • 5.5.1.3 How it works…
      • 5.5.2 Synchronize maps
        • 5.5.2.1 Goal
        • 5.5.2.2 How to do it…
        • 5.5.2.3 How it works…
        • 5.5.2.4 See also
      • 5.5.3 Showing the mouse location
        • 5.5.3.1 Goal
        • 5.5.3.2 How to do it…
        • 5.5.3.3 How it works…
      • 5.5.4 Listening for changes on vector data
        • 5.5.4.1 Goal
        • 5.5.4.2 How to do it…
        • 5.5.4.3 How it works…
      • 5.5.5 Styling features under the pointer
        • 5.5.5.1 Goal
        • 5.5.5.2 How to do it…
        • 5.5.5.3 How it works…
        • 5.5.5.4 See also
  • 6. Overlays
    • 6.1 Introducing overlays
      • 6.1.1 Adding overlays to the map
    • 6.2 The practice
      • 6.2.1 A basic overlay
        • 6.2.1.1 Goal
        • 6.2.1.2 How to do it…
        • 6.2.1.3 How it works…
        • 6.2.1.4 See also
      • 6.2.2 Using overlays as markers
        • 6.2.2.1 Goal
        • 6.2.2.2 How to do it…
        • 6.2.2.3 How it works…
        • 6.2.2.4 See also
  • 7. Controls and Interactions
    • 7.1 Controls
      • 7.1.1 The base class ol.control.Control
      • 7.1.2 The controls hierarchy
      • 7.1.3 Styling controls
      • 7.1.4 Managing controls
        • 7.1.4.1 Default controls
      • 7.1.5 OpenLayers3 controls
        • 7.1.5.1 ol.control.Attribution
        • 7.1.5.2 ol.control.Rotate
        • 7.1.5.3 ol.control.MousePosition
        • 7.1.5.4 ol.control.Scaleline
        • 7.1.5.5 ol.control.Zoom
        • 7.1.5.6 ol.control.ZoomSlider
        • 7.1.5.7 ol.control.ZoomToExtent
        • 7.1.5.8 ol.control.OverviewMap
        • 7.1.5.9 ol.control.FullScreen
    • 7.2 Interactions
      • 7.2.1 The base class ol.interaction.Interaction
      • 7.2.2 The interactions hierarchy
      • 7.2.3 Managing interactions
        • 7.2.3.1 Default interactions
      • 7.2.4 Understanding how interactions works
      • 7.2.5 Managing feature changes through ol.FeatureOverlay class
        • 7.2.5.1 The ol.FeatureOverlay class
      • 7.2.6 OpenLayers3 interactions
        • 7.2.6.1 ol.interaction.DoubleClickZoom
        • 7.2.6.2 ol.interaction.KeyboardPan
        • 7.2.6.3 ol.interaction.KeyboardZoom
        • 7.2.6.4 ol.interaction.MouseWheelZoom
        • 7.2.6.5 ol.interaction.PinchRotate
        • 7.2.6.6 ol.interaction.PinchZoom
        • 7.2.6.7 ol.interaction.DragPan
        • 7.2.6.8 ol.interaction.DragBox
        • 7.2.6.9 ol.interaction.DragZoom
        • 7.2.6.10 ol.interaction.DragRotate
        • 7.2.6.11 ol.interaction.DragRotateAndZoom
        • 7.2.6.12 ol.interaction.DragAndDrop
        • 7.2.6.13 ol.interaction.Select
        • 7.2.6.14 ol.interaction.Draw
        • 7.2.6.15 ol.interaction.Modify
    • 7.3 The practice
      • 7.3.1 A static map
        • 7.3.1.1 Goal
        • 7.3.1.2 How to do it…
        • 7.3.1.3 How it works…
      • 7.3.2 Playing with controls
        • 7.3.2.1 Goal
        • 7.3.2.2 How to do it…
        • 7.3.2.3 How it works…
        • 7.3.2.4 See also
      • 7.3.3 Creating a custom control
        • 7.3.3.1 Goal
        • 7.3.3.2 How to do it…
        • 7.3.3.3 How it works…
        • 7.3.3.4 There is more…
      • 7.3.4 Working with feature overlay
        • 7.3.4.1 Goal
        • 7.3.4.2 How to do it…
        • 7.3.4.3 How it works…
      • 7.3.5 Managing interactions
        • 7.3.5.1 Goal
        • 7.3.5.2 How to do it…
        • 7.3.5.3 How it works…
      • 7.3.6 Selecting features
        • 7.3.6.1 Goal
        • 7.3.6.2 How to do it…
        • 7.3.6.3 How it works…
        • 7.3.6.4 See also
      • 7.3.7 Editing features
        • 7.3.7.1 Goal
        • 7.3.7.2 How to do it…
        • 7.3.7.3 How it works…
        • 7.3.7.4 See also
      • 7.3.8 Selecting features within a vector box
        • 7.3.8.1 Goal
        • 7.3.8.2 How to do it…
        • 7.3.8.3 How it works…

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