Microservices - A Practical Guide
Microservices - A Practical Guide
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Microservices - A Practical Guide

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Completed on 2018-06-12

About the Book

Microservices have many advantages: Efficiently implementing more features, bringing software into production faster, robustness and easy scalability are among them. But implementing a microservices architecture and selecting the necessary technologies are difficult challenges.

This book shows microservices recipes that architects can customize and combine into a microservices menu. In this way, the implementation of microservices can be individually adapted to the requirements of the project.

Eberhard Wolff introduces microservices, self-contained systems, micro- and macro-architecture and the migration to microservices. The second part shows the microservices recipes: Basic technologies such as Docker or PaaS, frontend integration with links, JavaScript or ESI (Edge Side Includes). This is followed by asynchronous microservices with Apache Kafka or REST / Atom. In the synchronous approaches, the book discusses REST with the Netflix stack, Consul, PaaS with Cloud Foundry, and Kubernetes. Finally, operations is discussed: Log Analysis with Elasticsearch and Kibana, Monitoring with Prometheus, and tracing with Zipkin.

For each recipe there are suggestions for variations and combinations. Readers can experience all technologies hands-on with a demo project on GitHub. The outlook picks up on the operation of microservices and also shows how the reader can start with microservices in concrete terms.

The book is being translated from German. So all content is already written - it just needs to be translated.

The book provides the technical tools to implement a microservices architecture. Demo projects and suggestions for self-study will complete the book.

Table of Contents

  • 0 Introduction
    • 0.1 Structure of the Book
    • 0.2 Target Group
    • 0.3 Prior Knowledge
    • 0.4 Quick Start
    • 0.5 Acknowledgements
    • 0.6 Website
  • Part I: Principles of Microservices
  • 1 Microservices
    • 1.1 Microservices: Definition
    • 1.2 Reasons for Microservices
    • 1.3 Challenges
    • 1.4 Independent Systems Architecture Principles (ISA)
    • 1.5 Variations
    • 1.6 Conclusion
  • 2 Micro and Macro Architecture
    • 2.1 Bounded Context and Strategic Design
    • 2.2 Technical Micro and Macro Architecture
    • 2.3 Operation: Micro or Macro Architecture?
    • 2.4 Give a Preference to Micro Architecture!
    • 2.5 Organizational Aspects
    • 2.6 Variations
    • 2.7 Conclusion
  • 3 Self-contained Systems
    • 3.1 Reasons for the Term Self-contained Systems
    • 3.2 Definition
    • 3.3 An Example
    • 3.4 SCSs and Microservices
    • 3.5 Challenges
    • 3.6 Variations
    • 3.7 Conclusion
  • 4 Migration
    • 4.1 Reasons for Migrating
    • 4.2 A Typical Migration Strategy
    • 4.3 Alternative Strategies
    • 4.4 Build, Operation, and Organisation
    • 4.5 Variations
    • 4.6 Conclusion
  • Part II: Technology Stacks
  • 5 Docker
    • 5.1 Docker for Microservices: Reasons
    • 5.2 Docker Basics
    • 5.3 Docker Installation and Docker Commands
    • 5.4 Installing Docker Hosts with Docker Machine
    • 5.5 Dockerfiles
    • 5.6 Docker Compose
    • 5.7 Variations
    • 5.8 Conclusion
  • 6 Technical Micro Architecture
    • 6.1 Requirements
    • 6.2 Reactive
    • 6.4 Spring Boot
    • 6.4 Go
    • 6.5 Variations
    • 6.6 Conclusion
  • 7 Concept: Frontend Integration
    • 7.1 Frontend: Monolith or Modular?
    • 7.2 Options
    • 7.3 Resource-oriented Client Architecture (ROCA)
    • 7.4 Challenges
    • 7.5 Benefits
    • 7.6 Variations
    • 7.7 Conclusion
  • 8 Recipe: Links and Client-side Integration
    • 8.1 Overview
    • 8.2 Example
    • 8.3 Variations
    • 8.4 Experiments
    • 8.5 Conclusion
  • 9 Recipe: Server-side Integration using Edge Side Includes (ESI)
    • 9.1 ESI: Concepts
    • 9.2 Example
    • 9.3 Varnish
    • 9.4 Recipe Variations
    • 9.5 Experiments
    • 9.6 Conclusion
  • 10 Concept: Asynchronous Microservices
    • 10.1 Definition
    • 10.2 Events
    • 10.3 Challenges
    • 10.4 Advantages
    • 10.5 Variations
    • 10.6 Conclusions
    • 11.1 Message-oriented Middleware (MOM)
    • 11.2 The Architecture of Kafka
    • 11.3 Events with Kafka
    • 11.4 Example
    • 11.5 Recipe Variations
    • 11.6 Experiments
    • 11.7 Conclusion
  • 12 Recipe: Asynchronous Communication with Atom and REST
    • 12.1 The Atom Format
    • 12.2 Example
    • 12.3 Recipe Variations
    • 12.4 Experiments
    • 12.5 Conclusion
  • 13 Concept: Synchronous Microservices
    • 13.1 Definition
    • 13.2 Challenges
    • 13.3 Benefits
    • 13.4 Variations
    • 13.5 Conclusion
  • 14 Recipe: REST with the Netflix Stack
    • 14.1 Example
    • 14.2 Eureka: Service Discovery
    • 14.3 Router: Zuul
    • 14.4 Load Balancing: Ribbon
    • 14.5 Resilience: Hystrix
    • 14.6 Recipe Variations
    • 14.7 Experiments
    • 14.8 Conclusion
  • 15 Recipe: REST with Consul and Apache httpd
    • 15.1 Example
    • 15.2 Service Discovery: Consul
    • 15.3 Routing: Apache httpd
    • 15.4 Consul Template
    • 15.5 Consul and Spring Boot
    • 15.6 DNS and Registrator
    • 15.7 Recipe Variations
    • 15.8 Experiments
    • 15.9 Conclusion
  • 16 Concept: Microservices Platforms
    • 16.1 Definition
    • 16.2 Variations
    • 16.3 Conclusion
  • 17 Recipe: Docker Containers with Kubernetes
    • 17.1 Kubernetes
    • 17.2 The Example with Kubernetes
    • 17.3 The Example in Detail
    • 17.4 Additional Kubernetes Features
    • 17.5 Recipe Variations
    • 17.6 Experiments
    • 17.7 Conclusion
  • 18 Recipe: PaaS with Cloud Foundry
    • 18.1 PaaS: Definition
    • 18.2 Cloud Foundry
    • 18.3 The Example with Cloud Foundry
    • 18.4 Recipe Variations
    • 18.5 Experiments
    • 18.6 Serverless
    • 18.7 Conclusion
  • Part III: Operation
  • 19 Concept: Operation
    • 19.1 Why Operation is Important
    • 19.2 Approaches for the Operation of Microservices
    • 19.3 Effects of the Discussed Technologies
    • 19.4 Conclusion
  • 20 Recipe: Monitoring with Prometheus
    • 20.1 Basics
    • 20.2 Metrics for Microservices
    • 20.3 Metrics with Prometheus
    • 20.4 Example with Prometheus
    • 20.5 Recipe Variations
    • 20.6 Experiments
    • 20.7 Conclusion
  • 21 Recipe: Log Analysis with the Elastic Stack
    • 21.1 Basics
    • 21.2 Logging with the Elastic Stack
    • 21.3 Example
    • 21.4 Recipe Variations
    • 21.5 Experiments
    • 21.6 Conclusion
  • 22 Recipe: Tracing with Zipkin
    • 22.1 Basics
    • 22.2 Tracing with Zipkin
    • 22.3 Example
    • 22.4 Recipe Variations
    • 22.5 Conclusion
  • 23 And Now What?
  • Appendix A: Installation of the Environment
  • Appendix B: Maven Commands
  • Appendix C: Docker and Docker Compose Commands
  • Notes

Bundles that include this book

Microservices - A Practical Guide
Microservices Primer
Microservices - Ein Überblick
Microservices Rezepte
Microservices Recipes
5 Books
$29.99
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About the Author

Eberhard Wolff
Eberhard Wolff

Eberhard Wolff has 15+ years of experience as an architect and consultant - often on the intersection of business and technology. He is a Fellow at innoQ in Germany. As a speaker, he has given talks at international conferences and as an author, he has written more than 100 articles and books e.g. about Microservices. His technological focus is on modern architectures – often involving Cloud, Continuous Delivery, DevOps, Microservices or NoSQL.

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