Exploring ES2016 and ES2017
Exploring ES2016 and ES2017
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Exploring ES2016 and ES2017

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Completed on 2018-02-19

About the Book

About the Author

Axel Rauschmayer
Axel Rauschmayer

Axel specializes in JavaScript and web development. He teaches classes for Ecmanauten, blogs at 2ality.com, holds talks and workshops at conferences and organizes the MunichJS user group.

Axel has been writing about ECMAScript 6 since early 2011.

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Exploring ES6
Exploring ES2016 and ES2017
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Exploring ES6
Setting up ES6
Exploring ES2016 and ES2017
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Table of Contents

  •  
    • What you need to know about this book
      • Support
    • About the author
  • I Background
    • 1. The TC39 process for ECMAScript features
      • 1.1 Who designs ECMAScript?
      • 1.2 How is ECMAScript designed?
        • 1.2.1 Problem: ECMAScript 2015 (ES6) was too large a release
        • 1.2.2 Solution: the TC39 process
      • 1.3 Don’t call them ECMAScript 20xx features
      • 1.4 Further reading
    • 2. FAQ: ES2016 and ES2017
      • 2.1 Isn’t ECMAScript 2016 too small?
  • II ECMAScript 2016
    • 3. Array.prototype.includes
      • 3.1 Overview
      • 3.2 The Array method includes
      • 3.3 Frequently asked questions
      • 3.4 Further reading
    • 4. Exponentiation operator (**)
      • 4.1 Overview
      • 4.2 An infix operator for exponentiation
      • 4.3 Examples
      • 4.4 Precedence
      • 4.5 Further reading
  • III ECMAScript 2017
    • 5. Async functions
      • 5.1 Overview
        • 5.1.1 Variants
        • 5.1.2 Async functions always return Promises
        • 5.1.3 Handling results and errors of asynchronous computations via await
      • 5.2 Understanding async functions
        • 5.2.1 Writing asynchronous code via generators
        • 5.2.2 Writing asynchronous code via async functions
        • 5.2.3 Async functions are started synchronously, settled asynchronously
        • 5.2.4 Returned Promises are not wrapped
      • 5.3 Tips for using await
        • 5.3.1 Don’t forget await
        • 5.3.2 You don’t need await if you “fire and forget”
        • 5.3.3 await is sequential, Promise.all() is parallel
      • 5.4 Async functions and callbacks
        • 5.4.1 Array.prototype.map()
        • 5.4.2 Array.prototype.forEach()
      • 5.5 Tips for using async functions
        • 5.5.1 Know your Promises
        • 5.5.2 Immediately Invoked Async Function Expressions
        • 5.5.3 Unit testing with async functions
        • 5.5.4 Don’t worry about unhandled rejections
      • 5.6 Further reading
    • 6. Shared memory and atomics
      • 6.1 Parallelism vs. concurrency
        • 6.1.1 Models of parallelism
      • 6.2 A history of JS parallelism
        • 6.2.1 The next step: SharedArrayBuffer
      • 6.3 Shared Array Buffers
        • 6.3.1 Creating and sending a Shared Array Buffer
        • 6.3.2 Receiving a Shared Array Buffer
      • 6.4 Atomics: safely accessing shared data
        • 6.4.1 Problem: Optimizations make code unpredictable across workers
        • 6.4.2 Solution: atomics
        • 6.4.3 Problem: torn values
      • 6.5 Shared Array Buffers in use
        • 6.5.1 Shared Array Buffers and the run-to-completion semantics of JavaScript
        • 6.5.2 Shared Array Buffers and asm.js and WebAssembly
        • 6.5.3 Sharing data other than integers
        • 6.5.4 How much faster is code that uses Shared Array Buffers?
      • 6.6 Example
        • 6.6.1 Using a shared lock
        • 6.6.2 Implementing a shared lock
        • 6.6.3 Conclusion for the example
      • 6.7 The API for shared memory and atomics
        • 6.7.1 SharedArrayBuffer
        • 6.7.2 Atomics
      • 6.8 FAQ
        • 6.8.1 What browsers support Shared Array Buffers?
      • 6.9 Further reading
    • 7. Object.entries() and Object.values()
      • 7.1 Overview
        • 7.1.1 Object.entries()
        • 7.1.2 Object.values()
      • 7.2 Object.entries()
        • 7.2.1 Setting up Maps via Object.entries()
        • 7.2.2 FAQ: Object.entries()
      • 7.3 Object.values()
    • 8. New string methods: padStart and padEnd
      • 8.1 Overview
      • 8.2 Why pad strings?
      • 8.3 String.prototype.padStart(maxLength, fillString=' ')
        • 8.3.1 A simple implementation of padStart()
      • 8.4 String.prototype.padEnd(maxLength, fillString=' ')
      • 8.5 FAQ: padStart and padEnd
        • 8.5.1 Why aren’t the padding methods called padLeft and padRight?
    • 9. Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptors()
      • 9.1 Overview
      • 9.2 Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptors()
      • 9.3 Use cases for Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptors()
        • 9.3.1 Use case: copying properties into an object
        • 9.3.2 Use case: cloning objects
        • 9.3.3 Use case: cross-platform object literals with arbitrary prototypes
      • 9.4 Pitfall: copying methods that use super
    • 10. Trailing commas in function parameter lists and calls
      • 10.1 Overview
      • 10.2 Trailing commas in object literals and Array literals
      • 10.3 Feature: allow trailing commas in parameter definitions and function calls

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