Docker for Web Developers
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Docker for Web Developers

A concise, practical, and easy-to-follow guide showing how Docker can quickly create web development environments on Windows, macOS, or Linux.

About the Book

How long does it take you to install web development dependencies?

A typical WordPress installation requires Apache, PHP, MySQL, and the application itself. Can those be installed on your OS? Are they identical across all platforms? With a single command, Docker can have them all running on Windows, macOS, or Linux in minutes. That environment can be transferred to another developer, device, or OS - it will work identically.

Docker benefits include…

  • dependencies are isolated: other than disk space, your PC is not changed. It's possible to run multiple versions of the same software at the same time, e.g. MySQL v5 and v8.
  • your web app becomes portable: it will work on any device regardless of the OS.
  • dependencies are lightweight: they can be started, stopped, removed, or reinstalled at any time.
  • older dependencies are supported: your app can continue to use the same dependencies forever.
  • risk-free development: your app is isolated - you can experiment without affecting your PC stability.
  • use the same tools and workflows: use whatever editor you like on Windows, macOS, or Linux.
  • deployments are more robust: your app can be launched on live servers and scaled according to demand.

Despite this, Docker is often shunned by web developers.

Docker is the most useful web development tool you're not using

It's considered too technical, unnecessary, or something for DevOps experts. Terminology and resources can be impenetrable and tutorials never explain how to use Docker during development. Until now…

"Docker for Web Developers" offers a concise and practical course with example projects that can be adapted for any software stack. You'll be using Docker in minutes and can progress at your own pace.

About the Author

Craig Buckler
Craig Buckler

Hello! I'm Craig Buckler, a freelance UK full-stack web developer and educator.

I've worked on the web for more than twenty years creating successful projects for large and small organisations. My courses and training materials include:

For more information, see CraigBuckler.com

Reader Testimonials

Ben Frain
Ben Frain

you’re missing a trick if you haven’t looked at Docker yet

I knew the sum total of nothing about Docker a month ago. I certainly didn't appreciate what it could do for the average web developer.

Lukas White
Lukas White

"Docker for Web Developers" converted me!

Docker seemed overly complex but you demystified it very well – thanks!

Table of Contents

  • About this book
    • 0.1 Preface
    • 0.2 Prerequisites
    • 0.3 Course website
    • 0.4 Book and/or videos?
    • 0.5 Example code
    • 0.6 Chat room
    • 0.7 Code conventions
    • 0.8 Further tips
    • 0.9 About me
    • 0.10 Copyright and distribution
  • ---

    1 Introduction
    • 1.1 "It works on my machine, buddy"
    • 1.2 Virtual machining
    • 1.3 Docker delivers
    • 1.4 Nah, I'm still not convinced
    • 1.5 Isn't {insert-technology-here} where it's at?
    • 1.6 Key points
  • ---

    2 What is Docker?
    • 2.1 Containers
    • 2.2 Images
    • 2.3 Volumes
    • 2.4 Networks
    • 2.5 Docker Compose
    • 2.6 Orchestration
    • 2.7 Docker client-server application
    • 2.8 Docker development strategies
    • 2.9 Simpler development and production
    • 2.10 When not to use Docker
    • 2.11 Docker alternatives
    • 2.12 Key points
  • ---

    3 How to install Docker
    • 3.1 Install Docker on Linux
    • 3.2 Install Docker on macOS
    • 3.3 Install Docker on Windows
    • 3.4 Test your Docker installation
    • 3.5 Key points
  • ---

    4 Launch a MySQL database with Docker
    • 4.1 Locate a suitable MySQL image on Docker Hub
    • 4.2 Launch a MySQL container
    • 4.3 Connect to the database using a MySQL client
    • 4.4 Connect to a container shell
    • 4.5 View, stop, and restart containers
    • 4.6 Define a Docker network
    • 4.7 Cleaning up
    • 4.8 Launch multiple containers with Docker Compose
    • 4.9 Key points
  • ---

    5 WordPress development with Docker
    • 5.1 WordPress requirements
    • 5.2 Docker configuration plan
    • 5.3 Docker Compose configuration
    • 5.4 Launch your WordPress environment
    • 5.5 Install WordPress
    • 5.6 Local WordPress Development
    • 5.7 Key points
  • ---

    6 Application development with Docker
    • 6.1 Container-based application development
    • 6.2 What is Node.js?
    • 6.3 Hello World application overview
    • 6.4 Docker configuration plan
    • 6.5 Dockerfiles
    • 6.6 Build an image
    • 6.7 Launch a production container from your image
    • 6.8 Launch a development environment with Docker Compose
    • 6.9 Live code editing
    • 6.10 Remote container debugging
    • 6.11 Create an image from a container
    • 6.12 Key points
  • ---

    7 Push your Docker image to a Repository
    • 7.1 Why push an image to Docker Hub?
    • 7.2 Docker Hub alternatives
    • 7.3 Image names and tags
    • 7.4 Create a Docker Hub repository
    • 7.5 Log in locally
    • 7.6 Build an application image
    • 7.7 Tag an image
    • 7.8 Push to Docker Hub
    • 7.9 Distribute your image
    • 7.10 Key points
  • ---

    8 Docker orchestration on production servers
    • 8.1 Dependency planning
    • 8.2 Application scaling
    • 8.3 Orchestration overview
    • 8.4 Docker Swarm
    • 8.5 Kubernetes
    • 8.6 Key points
  • ---

    9 Your Docker journey
    • 9.1 Docker's future
    • 9.2 Further Docker help
  • ---

    10 Appendix A: Docker command-line reference
    • 10.1 Log into Docker Hub
    • 10.2 Search Docker Hub
    • 10.3 Pull a Docker Hub image
    • 10.4 List Docker images
    • 10.5 Build an image from a Dockerfile
    • 10.6 Tag an image
    • 10.7 Push tagged images to Docker Hub
    • 10.8 Launch a container from an image
    • 10.9 List containers
    • 10.10 Run a command in a container
    • 10.11 Attach to a container shell
    • 10.12 Restart a container
    • 10.13 Pause a container
    • 10.14 Unpause (resume) a container
    • 10.15 View container metrics
    • 10.16 Increase container resources
    • 10.17 Stop a container
    • 10.18 Remove stopped containers
    • 10.19 View Docker volumes
    • 10.20 Delete a volume
    • 10.21 Bind mount a host directory
    • 10.22 Define a Docker network
    • 10.23 View networks
    • 10.24 Delete a network
    • 10.25 View system disk usage
    • 10.26 Full clean start
  • ---

    11 Appendix B: Dockerfile reference
    • 11.1 # comment
    • 11.2 ARG arguments
    • 11.3 ENV environment variables
    • 11.4 FROM <image> starting image
    • 11.5 WORKDIR working directory
    • 11.6 COPY files from the host to image
    • 11.7 ADD files
    • 11.8 Mount a VOLUME
    • 11.9 Set a USER
    • 11.10 RUN a command
    • 11.11 EXPOSE a port
    • 11.12 CMD execute container
    • 11.13 ENTRYPOINT execute container
    • 11.14 .dockerignore file patterns
  • ---

    12 Appendix C: Docker Compose reference
    • 12.1 Docker Compose CLI
    • 12.2 docker-compose.yml outline
    • 12.3 Starting image
    • 12.4 build an image from a Dockerfile
    • 12.5 Set the container_name
    • 12.6 Container depends_on another
    • 12.7 Set environment variables
    • 12.8 Set environment variables from a env_file
    • 12.9 Attach to Docker networks
    • 12.10 Attach persistent Docker volumes
    • 12.11 Set a custom dns server
    • 12.12 expose ports
    • 12.13 Define external_links to other containers
    • 12.14 Override the default command
    • 12.15 Override the default entrypoint
    • 12.16 Specify a restart policy
    • 12.17 Run a healthcheck
    • 12.18 Define a logging service
  • ---

    13 Appendix D: quiz project
    • 13.1 Project overview
    • 13.2 Launch in development mode
    • 13.3 Launch in production mode
    • 13.4 Clean up
    • 13.5 Project file structure
    • 13.6 nodejs Docker image
    • 13.7 nginx Docker image
    • 13.8 mongodb Docker image
    • 13.9 Node.js build process
    • 13.10 Node.js Express.js application
    • 13.11 Client-side files
    • 13.12 Key points

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